How to Win a Free Copy of Harry Potter and the Art of Spying

Goodreads Header

As you probably know by now, we are giving away five copies of Harry Potter and the Art of Spying on Goodreads in the month of February. We had nearly 1,000 readers enter to win our last Goodreads Giveaway in July. So how do you help make sure that you are one of the five lucky winners? Read these tips to find out!

First – Goodreads’ method of selecting winners:

‘If more people are interested in a book than there are copies available [which is nearly always the case], we will pick the winners at our discretion. The factors that go into our algorithm are: randomness, site activity, genre of books on your shelves, current phase of the moon, and more.’

This is SO important! In order to up your chances of winning a copy of Harry Potter and the Art of Spying, you need to get active on Goodreads. Here are some tips:

1. Write reviews

Did you LOVE Gone Girl? Then write a line or two about it on Goodreads. Better yet, have you gotten into indie books lately? Then do those writers a big favor and tell the world what you think! Even if you didn’t love a book, more reviews give other readers a better idea of whether or not they should try it. More importantly, we, as authors, want to hear what you think!

2. Visit Goodreads more often

If one of the criteria is “site activity,” it’s important that you get on Goodreads and demonstrate that you make good use of your account. Goodreads wants to give books to people who will review them on their website, put them on a few lists, and vote in a few polls. Do all of the above and you might move to the top of the list!

3. Add some books to your shelves

If you add books that are in a similar genre to the one you want to win, many people believe it will increase your chances of winning the giveaway.

4. Rate books

If you have books on your “Read” shelf that you haven’t rated yet, rate them now! It’s an easy way to increase your chances of winning.

And the best way to increase your chances of winning a free book? Follow the Art of Spying blog, “like” us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter. That way, you’ll always know when we are hosting new giveaways!

The Spy for a Cause – Draco Malfoy

Draco Slide

Draco Malfoy

If you’ve been following along, you know that people often spy for personal reasons – patriotism/loyalty, fear, love, etc. There is one personal motivation we HAVE to mention, because it is SO important both in the real world and in the Harry Potter series. And that motivation is…

REVENGE!

ANALYSIS: Why would Draco Malfoy agree to try to kill Dumbledore in book 6, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince?

Remember that, by that point in the series, Draco’s father is imprisoned and derided as a known Death Eater. Voldemort personally gives Draco his assignment, which makes Draco feel powerful and important at the precise moment he has begun to be humiliated by his father. But one must wonder, just as Professor Dumbledore wonders when he is visiting with Snape, whether Draco’s heart is really in it. Draco is not evil at this point, but simply terribly misdirected. His motive is revenge, not hatred, and the difference between the two is significant. Draco seems somewhat apathetic to Lord Voldemort’s cause. In book 7, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Draco observes Lord Voldemort torturing and killing people—including Hogwarts’s Muggle Studies teacher, Professor Charity Burbage, the woman twisting above the drawing room table (DH 3, 11). When he sees his father forced to give his wand to Lord Voldemort, we imagine that he begins to understand Voldemort quite well and perhaps has terrible misgivings about the Dark Lord’s presence in his family’s home (a point raised by Voldemort at the time—perhaps by use of Legilimency!).

We assert that Lucius and Narcissi Malfoy come to the same conclusion by the end of the series, as shown in the final installation of the film series: during the last battle, they grab Draco and quietly leave the scene, no doubt to go into hiding—away from Lord Voldemort, in case he is successful, and in a position to claim they did not fight for him if the tide is turned. A shrewd move indeed, Mr. and Mrs. Malfoy! You will also note that, in the movie version, Draco has a hard time leaving his friends when asked to do so. He is clearly conflicted; after all, he had been saved just a little while ago by Harry Potter (to Ron’s great chagrin!) when the Room of Requirements went up in magical flames (DH 633–34).

Draco Malfoy Analysis

Recruitment by: Voldemort himself, no doubt

Incentive Used: Revenge for father’s downfall

Handler: Voldemort, perhaps through Lucius Malfoy or other Death Eaters when necessary (as when Lucius is in prison)

Method of Communication: Face-to-face

Memorable Quote:

“I haven’t got any options! I’ve got to do it! He’ll kill me! He’ll kill my whole family!” (HBP 591).

Dumbledore: “A frightened teenage boy is a danger to others as well as to himself. Offer him help and guidance, he ought to accept, he likes you—”

Snape: “—much less since his father has lost favor. Draco blames me, he thinks I have usurped Lucius’s position” (DH 682).

A Day of Remembrance

Saluting Trade Center Memorial

Although we at Art of Spying tend to focus on the whimsical and the entertainment value of the Potter series, there are some days where we must take a moment to be serious, and this is one of those days. However, the magic of Harry Potter is that it portrays both the light and dark in the world and, perhaps, offers a way to deal with the dark moments even as it helps us to celebrate the light ones.

The September 11th attacks happened 13 years ago today.

Many of our readers grew up not only with Harry Potter, but the specter of the twin towers falling, the Pentagon burning, and a plane burrowing in upon a flat Pennsylvania field.

There were many heroes that day.  Some lived.  Some didn’t.

Some were victims of chance, being at the wrong place at the wrong time.  But many were persons who chose to be there, chose to walk up those steps, fight those fires, take over a hijacked plane, put themselves in harm’s way.

All are worthy of our remembrance.

In the Wizarding World of Harry Potter, we all were touched by the sacrifice of those who gave their lives for the true greater good, a life without fear, without torture, without the specter of an evil Dark Lord who wanted to not only control the world, but torment it.

Lupin and Resurrection Stone

In one of the scenes of the final battle of Hogwarts, Harry enters the great hall to see bodies strewn on the floor:  Tonks, Remus, Fred, and even little Colin Creevey.  Many of us, as we read this abject scene, shed tears.

Death is hard.  And yet sacrifice based purely on principle, or in aid of another, is perhaps the greatest virtue that one can envision or dare to impart.

For every person who lost his or her life in the final Battle of Hogwarts, hundreds perished on 9/11.  Every one of them had a family, loved ones, children waiting for a parent to come home . . . who never did.

So on this day, when we remember sacrifice – and death – and choosing to help others – and dying for a principle – let us pause for just a moment, and think of that which is worth fighting for.

Something Worth Fighting For

Today we call most fervently upon the memory of those who have, in support of freedom and in the assistance of others, done what needed to be done, at times giving the greatest sacrifice.

To those we give thanks, and our solemn remembrance.

Respectfully,

Lynn and Peter

Answers: Close Your Mind, Harry!

Dpt_of_Mysteries

Did you open your mind enough to remember the answers to yesterday’s quiz? Find out by checking your answers below. Let us know how you did in the comments!

1. As Harry leaves Grimmauld Place to return to Hogwart’s after Christmas break, Sirius gives him a special communication device. What is it?

A two-way mirror

2. What is the mode of transportation back to Hogwarts after Christmas break?

The Knight Bus

3. Who is the driver (who is later arrested by the Ministry on trumped up charges)?

Stan Shunpike

4. Dumbledore realizes through his double agent that Voldemort perceived Harry’s intrusion into his mind when he was possessing the snake. What countermeasure does Dumbledore insist Harry learn to prevent Voldemort from turning Harry into a spy against him?

Occlumency

5. When Harry asks Snape how they know that Voldemort detected Harry, Snape applies the need-to-know rule against Harry, and tells him what?

It is enough that we know

6. Before their special lessons, Snape takes what and puts them away in a secure location?

His memories

7. When Snape is able to see Harry’s memories that he fears, Snape warns Harry about what?

That he is giving his enemy weapons to use against him

8. During Harry’s lesson with Snape he is able to see further along the hallway of his dreams and recognizes where the hallway is located. Which is where?

The Department of Mysteries

9. What is the name of the Weasley twins’ new invention that makes your head disappear?

Headless Hats

10. Why should the Weasley twins be assigned to the CIA Science and Technology directorate?

Because they invent wonderful devices for surveillance, diversions, and much, much more! 

We’ll be investigating another spy from the Harry Potter series this Thursday… Stop back then!

The Spies Among Us: Patriotism Gone Bad

Death Eaters

Death Eaters

Patriotism does not necessarily mean that the cause the spy holds dear is related to a nation or the security of a specific nation, as is clearly evident by Voldemort’s Death Eaters. They are against a nation, and indeed, the whole Wizarding world and the world of Muggles. Their cause is Voldemort, or perhaps the desire to obtain power through Voldemort.

Analysis:

Recruitment by: Presumably Voldemort

Incentive Used: Assertion of Wizarding superiority, the opportunity to wreak havoc and assert extraordinary power over Wizards and Muggles alike

Handler: Voldemort or a Death Eater who has a close connection to Voldemort

Method of Communication: Direct assignments from Voldemort, messages sent through another Death Eater, or use of the Dark Mark on the Death Eater’s arm

Memorable Quote:

Sirius: “Well, you don’t just hand in your resignation to Voldemort. It’s a lifetime of service or death” (OP).

Quirrell: “There is no good and evil… there is only power, and those too weak to understand it… Since then, I serve him faithfully, although I have let him down many times.” (SS)

When Voldemort returns at the end of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, you can see exactly what kind of relationship Death Eaters have with their handler, Voldemort. The Dark Lord demands loyalty and disappointing him is dangerous to say the least.

The first blog post in the Spies Among Us series was about Mundungus Fletcher, a Spy for Hire.

Break the Code: The Cover of Harry Potter and the Art of Spying

In order to make things a bit more interesting, the authors of Harry Potter and the Art of Spying decided to put a few codes to break on the front cover and the back inside cover.

So, let’s take a peek at the front cover:

HP cover

 

Notice the different coloring lettering on the authors’ names?

What could this mean?

Hint:  The black letters create one full English sentence.

Get it yet?

Ok, we’ll help a little!

Another hint:  The sentence is created by four letters that translate easily into four words, and the remaining three letters spell the last word!

So, let’s first put the letters in order as the names Lynn Boughey and Peter Earnest would normally be read:

L—U—Y—P— R— A —S.

Doesn’t sound like a word, or a full sentence!  So let’s try something else.  Read the letter left to right:

Y—P—R—U— A— S —Y?

Figure it out yet?

Next hint:  By moving one letter, you get the answer, which again is one complete English sentence.

So, say the letters out loud as words:

Y—P—R—U— A— S —Y sounded out is,

Why Pee Are You A S Why?

Now, move just one letter somewhere else:

Y—P—R—U— A— S —Y?

Got it?  If not, the another hint should finish the job!

Hint:  We would never use the word “pee” on our cover, but we might use the letter “P”!

So, remove the “P,” AND YOU GET:

Y—R—U— A— S —Y?

And you get, sounding out the letters as words:

Why are you a “S” “Y”?

Now put the “P” back in, and you get:

Y—R—U— A— S —P—Y?

Which when read out loud and as four letter-words and one three-letter word is . . . . . .

Why are you a SPY?

Rita Skeeter Interviews President Obama

President Obama Calls Hillary a Loser and John Boehner He-Who-Should-Not-Be-Named

by Special Correspondent Rita Skeeter*

Rita Skeeter Pic Obama stern

June 23, 2014

Rita Skeeter:  Thank you for having me here in the White House, President Obama.

The President:  Glad to have you.  But I didn’t quite understand which organization you are with.  The Daily ProphetThe Quibbler?

Rita Skeeter:  Oh, they didn’t tell you.  Fox News, of course.  Special correspondent.  All that jazz.

The President:  [shifting uncomfortably in his chair] Well, actually, I guess that figures  . . .

Rita Skeeter:  Read any good books lately?

The President:  Well, I am just now in the middle of Harry Potter and the Art of Spying by Lynn Boughey and Peter Earnest.  Peter is the head of the International Spy Museum and Michelle and my kids love going there, as Michelle has mentioned once on national TV.

Rita Skeeter:  I understand that you are a fan of Harry Potter.

The President:  Yes I am.  I loved reading those books to my daughters when they were young.  Great memories.

Rita Skeeter:  Any thoughts on how the series relates to the real world?

The President:  Well sure, it is hard not to think of Congress, and most particularly the House of Representatives, when you read about the Ministry of Magic.

Rita Skeeter:  Does that make you Cornelius Fudge?

The President:  No, I’d like to think of myself more as Dumbledore, if he were Minister of Magic.

Rita Skeeter:  But you’re married.

The President:  Well, yes, . . . but that’s allowed now, in part thanks to . . .

Rita Skeeter:  Fine, fine.  So what do you really think about John Boehner?

The President:  I consider him He-Who-Should-Not-Be-Named.

Rita Skeeter:  Well, I guess we hit a soft spot there.  How about the Supreme Court?

The President:  There are four of them I like a lot, a fifth who it depends on the day, and the others . . .

Rita Skeeter:  Death Eaters?

The President:  Well, let’s just say I wouldn’t want them to be part of the Wizengamot.

Rita Skeeter:  And what about Hillary Clinton.  She used to work for you, a really really big supporter . . . after losing to you, I recall . . . So, if you are the Minister of Magic, is she your  Professor Umbridge?

The President:  [bristling, a touch of anger showing] Hillary is no Umbridge!  She is, if anyone, Hermione Granger—a present day Hermione Granger . . . she is bright, hard-working, and frankly, given some of the things she was able to do as Secretary of State, I think she can do magic too!

Rita Skeeter:  So, have you read her new book?

The President:  I have.  It’s wonderful!

Rita Skeeter:  In the first chapter at page 19 she mentions that she didn’t always agree with you, but she refused to provide any juicy details because you are still President.  Would you like to share those times when the two of you were at each other’s throats?

The President:  I am happy to say we were never “at each other’s throats.”  We sometimes disagreed.  I don’t hire “yes men” – or “yes women.”

Rita Skeeter:  So when you disagreed, who won?

The President:  Well, as President, I guess I get the final say, so that would be me.

Rita Skeeter:  Lovely.  Thanks for the lead.  Now, are you finally ready to admit that we shouldn’t have gone into Iraq?

The President:  [again, bristling] I believe, if you check your facts, that it was the previous president who did that.

Rita Skeeter:  [disdainfully] Facts, facts . . . they have a habit of getting in the way of a good story, like, say, Benghazi.  Shall we talk about that?  Hillary blew that one too, right?

The President:  Hillary did exactly what anyone else would have done in that situation.   She explains everything in her book.

Rita Skeeter:  Yes, and we all noticed that she took the blame . . .

The President:  Yes, she did.

Rita Skeeter:  So the buck stops here – stops at the woman’s desk?

The President:  [anger clearly being suppressed]  I think we are about done here . . .  [starting to rise from chair]

Rita Skeeter:  Just a few more questions, if that is OK.  What are you most proud of during your term?

The President:  Well, the health care reform . . .

Rita Skeeter:  Which we noticed you named after yourself . . .

The President:  I believe its actual name is the Affordable Health Care Act, and I think the intent by others in naming it ObamaCare was kind of like putting Nifflers in Professor Umbridge’s office – but I have come to accept the nomenclature . . .

Rita Skeeter:  Get anything else done?

The President:  Well, yes.  Named several people to the Supreme Court, saved the economy that I inherited, got out of one war I inherited –

Rita Skeeter:  How’s that going so far?

The President:  That’s it.  [standing]  Nice to meet you.  [pointing to her acid green quill]  Nice pen, too.

[The President leaves.]

*Interview discovered by Lynn Boughey, co-author of Harry Potter and the Art of Spying and provided as a public service as a blog on www.artofspying.net