Hidden References in Harry Potter and the Art of Spying Chapter Titles!

James Bond a View to Kill

What do James Bond, the Bible, and Shakespeare’s Othello have in common? They are all referenced in Harry Potter and the Art of Spying. Check out the secrets behind some of our most inventive chapter titles.

Chapter 21 Hagrid’s Unseen Lesson—Harry’s “Wet” Kiss—A Snake’s-Eye View to a Kill

A View to a Kill (1985) is the fourteenth spy film of the James Bond series, and the seventh and last to star Roger Moore as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. Although the title is adapted from Ian Fleming‘s short story “From a View to a Kill“, the film is the fourth Bond film after The Spy Who Loved Me, Moonraker and Octopussy to have an entirely original screenplay. In A View to a Kill, Bond is pitted against Max Zorin, who plans to destroy California’s Silicon Valley.

Chapter 22 Seeing through the Eyes of the Enemy—Slithering Toward Bethlehem—A Portrait Is Worth a Thousand Words

The Second Coming is a poem composed by Irish poet W. B. Yeats in 1919, first printed in The Dial in November 1920. The poem uses Christian imagery regarding the Apocalypse and second coming allegorically to describe the atmosphere of post-war Europe.  Its last two lines are:

And what rough beast, its hour come round at last,
Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born? 

Slouching Towards Bethlehem is a 1968 collection of essays by Joan Didion and mainly describes her experiences in California during the 1960s. Joan Didion is an American author best known for her novels and her literary journalism. Her novels and essays explore the disintegration of American morals and cultural chaos, where the overriding theme is individual and social fragmentation. A sense of anxiety or dread permeates much of her work.

A picture is worth a thousand words” is an adage that refers to the notion that a complex idea can be conveyed with just a single still image. It also aptly characterizes one of the main goals of visualization, namely making it possible to absorb large amounts of data quickly.  The expression “Use a picture. It’s worth a thousand words.” appears in a 1911 newspaper article quoting newspaper editor Arthur Brisbane discussing journalism and publicity.

Chapter 23To Be or Not to Be (a Snake)—Bravery, Risk, and the Consequences to Those Who Serve—Keeping, Revealing, and Acknowledging Family Secrets

To be or not to be…” is the opening phrase of a soliloquy in the “Nunnery Scene” of William Shakespeare‘s playHamlet.  In the speech, a despondent or feigning Prince Hamlet contemplates death and suicide. He bemoans the pains and unfairness of life but acknowledges the alternative might be still worse. The speech functions within the play to explain Hamlet’s hesitation to directly and immediately avenge his father‘s murder (discovered in Act I) on his uncle, stepfather, and new king Claudius.

Chapter 25 Young Love in Shambles—The Green Monster of Jealousy—Bribing Someone Who Bugs You—Using the Press

Green-Eyed Monster may refer to jealousy, a phrase possibly coined by Shakespeare in Othello (Act III, scene 3, line 169):

IAGO         O, beware, my lord, of jealousy; It is the green-ey’d monster

Chapter 31 Let the Test Be with You—Theory Meets Practice—Toad-Face Meets Old Wizarding Faces—A “Stunning” Observation from the Astronomy Tower

Let the Test Be with You refers to the Star Wars mantra and farewell, “May the force be with you.” The expression “May the Force be with you” has achieved cult status and is symbolic of the Star Wars legacy. The line has been said by at least one character in each of the Star Wars movies. The famous line is actually said by General Dodonna after explaining the Death Star attack plan to the Rebel pilots. It is said again by Han Solo to Luke, right before the attack on the Death Star battle station. The line is also said by Luke Skywalker at the end of The Empire Strikes Back.

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