More Literary References in HARRY POTTER AND THE ART OF SPYING Chapter Titles!

read-between-lines

Last week, we revealed the hidden meaning in the five chapter titles from Harry Potter and the Art of Spying. Here are five more!

Chapter 10  Strangers in a Strange Land—An Introduction to Luna Lovegood

Stranger in a Strange Land is a 1961science fiction novel by American author Robert A. Heinlein. It tells the story of Valentine Michael Smith, a human who comes to Earth in early adulthood after being born on the planet Mars and raised by Martians. The novel explores his interaction with—and eventual transformation of—terrestrial culture.

 Check out the book that was banned in Texas for its adult themes:

Chapter 12  Professor Umbridge—Liar, Traitor, Soldier, Spy

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is a 1974 spy novel by British author John le Carré, featuring George Smiley. Smiley is a taciturn, middle-aged intelligence officer who has been forced into retirement. He is recalled to hunt down a Soviet mole in the “Circus”, the highest echelon of the British Secret Intelligence Service.

 Did you see the movie in 2011?

Chapter 13  Cruel and Unusual Punishment, or, Getting to the Point about Lying

Cruel and unusual punishment is a phrase describing punishment which is considered unacceptable due to the suffering, pain, or humiliation it inflicts on the person subjected to it.  . . . These exact words were first used in the English Bill of Rights in 1689, and later were also adopted by the Eighth Amendment to the United States Constitution (ratified 1791) and British Leeward IslandsSlavery Amelioration Act (1798).         

 

Chapter 16  Harry Takes the Lead—A Not-So-Secret Meeting—We Band of Brothers (and Sisters)

“We band of brothers” comes from William Shakespeare‘s play Henry V in Act IV Scene iii 18–67, where Henry V delivers his famous  St. Crispin’s Day speech wherein he states:

We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother;

 See the whole (epic) speech 

Chapter 19  Sticks and Stones May Break My Bones . . . But Your Temper May Get You Banned from Quidditch

“Sticks and stones will break my bones” is an English language children’s rhyme. It persuades the child victim of name-calling to ignore the taunt, to refrain from physical retaliation, and to remain calm and good-natured:

Sticks and stones will break my bones
But words will never harm me.

Click here for more hidden references!

3 comments on “More Literary References in HARRY POTTER AND THE ART OF SPYING Chapter Titles!

  1. Beata says:

    Thank you for interesting information.

  2. Hello exceptional blog! Does running a blog similar to this take a
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    • lynnboughey says:

      Blogs are pretty simple to set up, you just have to be dedicated to publishing posts fairly frequently. We have a schedule (Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays) that we stick to in order to keep ourselves on track. It’s also good to stock up on material for your blog so if you have a busy week you don’t fall behind. Most blogs require little knowledge of coding as long as you go through some sort of blog hosting site (WordPress, Blogger, etc.)

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